In the sweet summer

below the rusty fasteners of

an old swing I pump the air

with the  spindly legs of childhood,

dream my wide eyed dreams of whirling

pathways to the beckoning sun.

My heart leaps at the sight of a brilliant

rainbow and with small fingers I reach up

to swathe its colors over a blue palette  sky.

Now I know about life, the real truth of it.

Now I know the swing is just freedom.

 

little girl with freckles

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180 thoughts on “freedom

      1. You too, Holly! 🙂 Sorry, since some days – our officials try to create a better internet connection – here most time of the day i only get 60 kbit/ sec. ;-( Lets praise the intelligence of Germany! Lol

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          1. I’m sure you can play back a lot of your past in the house and swing. The lone child to rule over your domain without interference is a nice thought as well. I had two younger sisters and an older brother. We are still very close although spread out far enough we cant get on anyone’s nerves. As long as you have a hummingbird feeder they will magically appear when the time is right.

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          2. Was this the genesis of your butterfly tat? I remember my grandmother warning me to be gentle with the butterflys because of their delicate wings. That just made me more curious and also impressed me that she was so thoughtful. I can relate to that feeling of finding butterfly dust on your fingers. That wasn’t supposed to happen.

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          3. 😁 no trickery intended my dear friend. I remember we talked about tattoos and I thought you told me you had a butterfly tat. It struck me that this early experience might have led you to it. I might be confused though. I’ve never met anyone with tats that didn’t have an interesting story about why that tat was there. It’s like the ropes. Once is often not enough.

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          4. Ahhh, then it was a crosslinked synapse. My apologies. I think you are right tho. If you did get a tattoo, the Monarch would be perfect for you. Placement on the body goes deep in our psyche. For instance, if you chose the left shoulder area it would symbolize self, on the right, memorializing a person that watched over you. The right arm, someone you love, the left arm your sense of duty. The list goes on. We tell a story about ourselves in pictures with our body art. No words are necessary.

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          5. We have a grand exhibit coming up in A&E soon. And just in time is Frolicon in Atlanta where a rope bondage session will be at the convention to introduce the art and teach newcomers the ropes. I’m sure YouTube will have a lot of videos up next week. In a show of solidarity with Moira and Ras, I’ve bought new linen rope made from flax. I like to use a lot of fusion knots to enhance the artistic beauty of the suspension and linen or cotton rope is gentle to delicate skin. 🧛🏻‍♂️🧛🏻‍♀️. I think the A&E final session will be intriguing and informative. 😉

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          6. It’s wonderful to have a large family. Even if there is physical distance. Being an only child has its benefits but one hardly has a choice in the matter. May your day be filled with hummingbirds, have a beautiful week end.

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          7. I can’t imagine life in quiet settings now. My personality is such that I deeply miss the agrarian world I grew up in, not for the harshness of that life, but for the vast refuge it offered. I could leave the back door and before I could hear the admonition for letting the screen door slam, I was in the tree line headed for sanctuary. At only 5 or 6 years old, I’d been taught all I needed to sustain my imagination safely in the forest. My only rule is I couldn’t go farther than my mothers yell out the back door for me to come home. It was far enough for me. My mother’s call seemed to carry a great distance. Imagine a child of today allowed to run free and happy in the forest. Thank you for the blessing of a beautiful weekend. I will make it so. And also, I appreciate your time and thoughts and wish you the best as well. 🤗🌞

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          8. This brings back many happy memories of childhood days of summer on an old rustic farm surrounded by cotton fields, tobacco, horses, streams , grape arbors and free as a bird to roam. Thank you For taking me back there for a while. Have a wonderful day!

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          9. I am a city girl Dan growing up in a subtropical metropolitan city, but during summer break from school my Dad delivered me to my grandparents and my memories of that time are some of the happiest.

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          10. I wish I could have lived in Florida until I moved out on my own. Life took me elsewhere. My oldest sister never lived further than 30 miles from the hospital she was born in Tallahassee. She loved it so much, she never left. She lives in the country down an old logging trail with the St Marks River behind the house. We were also left all summer with our grand parents and they truly were the best years of my life. I didnt realize my mother and father had three months out of every year practicing to be empty nesters. When my father was in the Navy, we lived with my grandmother who took the opportunity to turn us into well mannered little hell raisers. When my father got out of the Navy he finished his degree at FSU. After that we began our gypsy life but were returned to Florida with haste each summer. I never once remembered any complaints to the drive by drop offs. 😎🌞

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          11. Children of the military live a unique life. I believe it gives one a broader understanding of the world and cultures. Friends that share that common military lifestyle see life in a way few others do. When dad got stationed in Pensacola, he brought us down from Tallahassee to live on the base. But, when he went to Cuba, he took us once again back to his mother, our grandmother, and she was pleased to have us. I have to say my grandmother took up the slack really well. She raised two boys so I was not much of a challenge. 😈

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          12. It truly is a community unto itself. Being duly spoiled by it, I stayed connected after I left the Army. So I still work for the Army on the arsenal and I hired all my army buddies I served with and we contiune to be wild and crazy guys doing good things for our country although, I have seen some gray hairs forming on my friends. I told them never fear, the silverbacks are the ones in charge of entertainment. Plus, no one would ever suspect us of being mischievous.

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          13. Army buddies can make fun out of anything. Only a raft of river otters are more fun. 😆. Thankfully, alcohol isn’t allowed at work or there would be whoopie cushions in every supervisors chair and water balloon booby traps in the toilets.

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          14. It does indeed get lonely. Your friends are your family. I remember coming home from deployments and there was no one to greet me and as I watched all of the families reunite and make plans to celebrate, I went back to my place, packed my gear and destressed in nature. Later, my friends would invite me to come over and I felt very much a part of the family. I actually didn’t realize how important this was until I was a senior NCO in charge of young soldiers and I saw how loneliness drove them to very bad decisions and so, I made it a point to be more than just the boss. They needed an older brother to guide them with good life decisions. Many of the men and women I raised from young pups have contacted me and are now senior leaders telling me, my investment saved them and helped them grow strong. That made all the sacrifice worth it. Deprivation makes strong bonds and the unchallenged life makes strong narcissists. I’m glad I chose well.

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          15. I have an anecdote for this but not now. I will say that one very lonely Easter,( my husband 24 on 24 off), his Master Sgt. unexpectedly, knowing I was alone, showed up to have me join his family for dinner. I was advised the next day two of their kids had come down with the measles. The rest is history. Lovely gesture though.

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  1. Freedom…. it’s a long time ago I sat on a swing under a rainbow.
    Yet, I get a small taste every time I’m in an alley, and find art.
    Wonderful poem, Holly!

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  2. Powerful!
    The real truth of life is freedom.
    We are all free.
    Our freedom is within.
    The sad part most people go to any length to stay in bondage.
    Great reminder.
    Thanks.

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          1. I don’t know what’s happening in WP, they are falling behind in many ways. I think it is a kind of look back scenario.
            Even I have been posting very infrequently as was busy fighting life elsewhere.
            You are always Welcome.
            XO

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  3. This reminds me of when I was a kid swinging like that and watching the clouds. I remember thinking I would buy a Bettle Bug car. LOL This is beautiful and playful Holly I love it! ❤

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  4. I could feel the wind rushing through my hair. Lovely.
    It took a long time to find freedom but it was there waiting for me when I moved across the Atlantic in 2007. Freedom comes in different shapes and sizes there is no “one size fits all.”

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